Service Level Agreement Canada

The Service Agreements Directive: essential elements are advice, instructions, practical examples and templates for those responsible for developing a service contract or verifying a service contract drawn up by the other party in the context of a service relationship under development. An accompanying document, the Guideline on Service Agreements: An Overview, provides executives and managers with key concepts to consider when drafting service agreements. Performance targets: Specific performance targets should be set out in the service agreement and include both service standards and customer satisfaction measures. Depending on the type of service in question, performance targets can be expressed as volumes per period, cost savings, response times, expected results, service levels, outputs, results or qualitative benefits achieved. Objectives should be measurable at a reasonable cost. Objectives should be comparable to different measures of cost, service level and satisfaction, in order to clearly demonstrate the degree of improvement achieved over time. It`s not uncommon to see blended finance models trying to tap into the best features of the three above. For example, in private sector and provincial government shared services models, some core functions are funded by a fixed allocation, while volume functions are funded by royalty-based cost coverage. If, when preparing a simple statement of intent, it is likely that some or all of these types of elements are indeed necessary, it is likely that the provision itself should be considered medium or complex and not simple or average. The choice of service contracts (MOU, MA and/or SLA) would be regulated accordingly. This section indicates the service that will be provided.

It should also identify any important service assumptions (e.g.B. multi-channel strategies and priorities such as personal centres within a region). Unique services: the total cost for creating and operating the single service, function or functionality. . . .